Health

Turnbull works to rectify health cuts

Edited by Nelly Tawil Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has confirmed he is working to rectify Tony Abbott’s grievous hospital funding cuts. Although he wouldn’t confirm any dollar figure, reports imply it’ll cost $5 billion. Mr. Turnbull is expected to meet state premiers and territory chief ministers in Canberra later this week to give a proposal to maintain activity-based funding and ...

Keen to improve your memory? It might be as simple as ABC, expert explains

Losing keys, forgetting names and not remembering important information for work or study? Many of us have first-hand experience with the frustrations of memory lapses, and it’s not unusual to be concerned that they are a sign of something sinister. But Professor Kaarin Anstey says most memory lapses are a normal part of the ageing process. Take the “tip of ...

Ambulance rammed at fast food car park in Melbourne’s north

Ambulance services were called to the car park on Racecourse Road shortly after 7:30pm on Friday after a report that a man was unconscious in a car. When paramedics tried to wake the man, police said he rammed his white Infinity sedan into the ambulance several times. The man also hit two other vehicles before driving off west along Racecourse ...

Interested in professional sword swallowing? Go on, have a stab

How does one become a professional sword swallower? And what happens when things go wrong? Two of the world’s most accomplished performers open up to Amanda Smith. Sticking things down your gullet for the entertainment of others may seem like a strange way to earn a living, but for professional sword swallowers it’s more fun than you can poke a ...

Is it worth becoming a human guinea pig? The risks and rewards of clinical trials

It’s estimated that millions of people worldwide take part in clinical trials, but when things go wrong in medical research there can be tragic consequences. Annabelle Quinceinvestigates the ethical dilemmas of testing drugs on humans. In January, a clinical trial in France went badly wrong. One young man died and several others suffered brain damage. The drug for treating mood ...

Fitness myth busted: You can’t control where on your body you lose weight from

In a dream world we’d get to choose exactly which areas on our body we shed excess weight from first. It seems to make sense: you want to get rid of trouble spots on your thighs, so you take up jogging. Carrying some excess baggage around the midsection? Must be time to increase the sit-ups and throw in some planks ...

How to turn a fitness goal into a lifetime of good health

While you’re working on your fitness resolutions, let’s clear up a few misconceptions: – Your weight will fluctuate, even after hitting that feel-good goal. It happens to everyone, even elite athletes. – At some point, you will hit a plateau. – Your running pace will regress after initial gains. – You will get stuck on a weight-lifting benchmark. None of ...

Health bodies refuse to release Zika virus details

Experts have questioned the decision by public health bodies to not reveal the countries that two pregnant Australian women with the Zika virus travelled to before being infected. On Thursday, Queensland Health reported a pregnant Australian woman infected with Zika had returned to the country after an overseas trip, while on Friday, Victoria’s health minister made a similar announcement about a woman ...

Value of BMI as health measure queried

It’s a scientific rule of thumb so widespread, so deeply embedded in a million magazine articles and diet plans, that it’s probably better known than all four laws of thermodynamics put together. Your health can be gauged by calculating your body mass index (BMI), a simple process that involves dividing your weight by the square of your height. It’s a formula used ...

Trimming the fat: how we could save billions in the health system

Australia’s health network is cheap and effective by international standards, but powerful vested interests are rorting the system.   Cervixes are the surprise new battleground in the fight to curb rising health costs. Just before Christmas, the federal government unveiled a plan to save public coffers $650 million a year by scrapping a bulk-billing incentive for pathologists and diagnostic service ...